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How To Appeal a Disability Claim Denial

Get Help Appealing Your Disability Denial

Every year millions of Americans are diagnosed with conditions hindering them from working, attempting to collect disability. Unfortunately the Social Security Administration must deny the majority of initial applications for disability benefits to ensure only qualified claimants are awarded benefits, generally around 75% of initial applications.

Fortunately many disabled Americans choose to move forward, attempting to receive disability benefits by appealing the initial denial. In 2014 a total of 2.5 million Americans filed for disability and over 800,000 were awarded benefits; if a claimant has been initially denied, there is still hope.

Common Reasons For Denial

An applicant will be denied if he or she:

  • did not have enough medical documentation to prove their disability.
  • did not attend a consultative exam request by the SSA.
  • did not complete the application properly.
  • has an impairment that is treatable within a year.
  • has not seen a physician in the past 6 months.
  • is working to many hours.
  • is earning more than the substantial gainful activity (SGA) limit.
  • is receiving too much in unearned income.

Once an applicant receives a denial letter, he or she has 60 days to file an appeal with the corresponding organization (typically the SSA) to move on to the next stage in the appeals process. Under most circumstances, applicants have a higher chance for approval by appealing the SSA’s decision rather than starting over with a new application.

Disability Claim Help

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Technical Denials

Get Help Appealing Your Disability Denial. Every year millions of Americans are diagnosed with conditions hindering them from working, attempting to collect disability. Unfortunately the Social Security Administration must deny the majority of initial applications for disability benefits to ensure only qualified claimants are awarded benefits, generally around 75% of initial applications. Fortunately many disabled Americans choose to move forward, attempting to receive disability benefits by appealing the initial denial. In 2014 a total of 2.5 million Americans filed for disability and over 800,000 were awarded benefits; if a claimant has been initially denied, there is still hope. Common Reasons For Denial. An applicant will be denied if he or she:

  • did not have enough medical documentation to prove their disability.
  • did not attend a consultative exam request by the SSA.
  • did not complete the application properly.
  • has an impairment that is treatable within a year.
  • has not seen a physician in the past 6 months.
  • is working to many hours.
  • is earning more than the substantial gainful activity (SGA) limit.
  • is receiving too much in unearned income.
  • Once an applicant receives a denial letter, he or she has 60 days to file an appeal with the corresponding organization (typically the SSA) to move on to the next stage in the appeals process. Under most circumstances, applicants have a higher chance for approval by appealing the SSA’s decision rather than starting over with a new application.

Four Stages to a Disability Appeal

Get Help Appealing Your Disability Denial. Every year millions of Americans are diagnosed with conditions hindering them from working, attempting to collect disability. Unfortunately the Social Security Administration must deny the majority of initial applications for disability benefits to ensure only qualified claimants are awarded benefits, generally around 75% of initial applications. Fortunately many disabled Americans choose to move forward, attempting to receive disability benefits by appealing the initial denial. In 2014 a total of 2.5 million Americans filed for disability and over 800,000 were awarded benefits; if a claimant has been initially denied, there is still hope. Common Reasons For Denial. An applicant will be denied if he or she:

  • did not have enough medical documentation to prove their disability.
  • did not attend a consultative exam request by the SSA.
  • did not complete the application properly.
  • has an impairment that is treatable within a year.
  • has not seen a physician in the past 6 months.
  • is working to many hours.
  • is earning more than the substantial gainful activity (SGA) limit.
  • is receiving too much in unearned income.
  • Once an applicant receives a denial letter, he or she has 60 days to file an appeal with the corresponding organization (typically the SSA) to move on to the next stage in the appeals process. Under most circumstances, applicants have a higher chance for approval by appealing the SSA’s decision rather than starting over with a new application.

Get Help Appealing Your Disability Denial. Every year millions of Americans are diagnosed with conditions hindering them from working, attempting to collect disability. Unfortunately the Social Security Administration must deny the majority of initial applications for disability benefits to ensure only qualified claimants are awarded benefits, generally around 75% of initial applications. Fortunately many disabled Americans choose to move forward, attempting to receive disability benefits by appealing the initial denial. In 2014 a total of 2.5 million Americans filed for disability and over 800,000 were awarded benefits; if a claimant has been initially denied, there is still hope. Common Reasons For Denial. An applicant will be denied if he or she:

  • did not have enough medical documentation to prove their disability.
  • did not attend a consultative exam request by the SSA.
  • did not complete the application properly.
  • has an impairment that is treatable within a year.
  • has not seen a physician in the past 6 months.
  • is working to many hours.
  • is earning more than the substantial gainful activity (SGA) limit.
  • is receiving too much in unearned income.
  • Once an applicant receives a denial letter, he or she has 60 days to file an appeal with the corresponding organization (typically the SSA) to move on to the next stage in the appeals process. Under most circumstances, applicants have a higher chance for approval by appealing the SSA’s decision rather than starting over with a new application.